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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

Airlines Start Their Engines as Scheduled Service Returns to Cuba
February 17, 2016

For millions of tourists every year, Las Vegas is the premiere travel destination for luxury hotels, glitzy nightclubs and extravagant casinos. But for a time, hordes of high-rolling American celebrities and affluent vacationers were beckoned also by the sultry nightlife of Havana, Cuba. Dozens of regularly scheduled flights by the day carried pleasure-seekers from Miami to the glittering shores of the Cuban capital.

This all came to an end, of course, once the U.S. imposed a strict embargo on the Caribbean nation, following the coup led by Fidel Castro, whose rise to power devastated Cuba’s once-thriving economy.

Now, more than 50 years later, this market is set to open up once again, and airlines couldn’t be more delighted. The U.S. and Cuba both agreed this week to reestablish scheduled air service, authorizing up to 120 commercial flights a day—20 between the U.S. and Havana, another 10 between the U.S. and nine other Cuban cities.

Competition to secure route access is likely to become red hot. American Airlines, United and JetBlue have already expressed interest, with American saying it “looks forward to submitting a Cuba service proposal.” But expect many more carriers to submit counter proposals in an attempt to gain the first-mover advantage.

Once regular service begins, possibly as early as this summer, an estimated 1.5 million American tourists will make their way to Cuba within the first year alone. This raises the question of whether the island’s tourism infrastructure is ready for such an influx of visitors, representing a huge opportunity for not just airlines but also car rental companies, food and beverage companies and hotel chains. To prepare for this explosion of visitors, the Cuban government is already seeking foreign investors.

It’s important to point out here that the embargo has been lifted for all forms of travel to Cuba except pure tourism. Americans can currently visit for up to 12 different approved reasons—including business, family, education and religious activities—but if policy continues to evolve at its current rate, pleasure should also be included one day.  

American Business Returns to Cuba

Just as American tourists once flocked to Havana, so too were American businesses deeply entrenched in Cuba. Before the embargo, U.S. financial interests were involved in Cuban mines, utilities, railways, sugar production and more.

That’s set to change too, as the U.S. government just granted an Alabama company permission to build a small factory in Cuba—the first to do so in over half a century, it’s believed. The company, Cleber, will produce affordable tractors designed for the Cuban market.

With normalization between the U.S. and Cuba being restored, and populations trending younger, many Americans are starting to abandon their Cold War-era attitudes. Since 1996, Gallop has polled Americans on their overall opinion toward Cuba, and for the first time this year, a majority of respondents—54 percent—held a favorable view of the island-nation.

Majority of Americans View Cuba Favorably for First Time
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Favorability has been rising steadily since 2006, in fact, which suggests that Americans increasingly see Cuba as a potential place to visit and do business in. This is what U.S. airlines, not to mention companies in other industries, are hoping to capitalize on.

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 12/31/2015: American Airlines Group Inc., United Continental Holdings Inc., JetBlue Airways Corp.

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Christmas Edition: 2015 in Review
December 28, 2015

Wishing you robust health, buckets of wealth, and tons of happiness

Christmas is my favorite holiday, as I’m sure it is for many of you reading this. We probably all agree that 2015 had more than its fair share of pain and tragedy around the world. But during Christmas, love and charity triumph—if only for a day—helping us recharge as we approach the new year.

I remember accompanying my mum, who was a social worker in downtown Toronto, as she delivered what we call “Star boxes” to needy children on Christmas Eve. Named after the Toronto Daily Star, which still operates the Santa Claus Fund that started in 1906, the purpose of the gift parcels remains the same:  to make sure that no child in Toronto under 13 is overlooked by Santa Claus.

Delivering these packages was more instructive than any textbook. It helped me keep my own family’s financial struggles in perspective and encouraged me to count my blessings. Although we didn’t have much, things could have been many times more challenging. I was grateful to have lots of love and plenty to eat when so many had neither during the cold, snowy Canadian winters.

The experience also showed me that love, family and friends should all be cherished much more highly than any material things. Having money is important, but real happiness can be found only in helping to spread happiness to others.

Merry Christmas: President Signs $680 Billion Business Investment Deal

President Obama signing the $1.1 trillion spending bill

Before we reach 2016, I want to reflect back on 2015. Everyone is talking about interest rates and monetary policy right now, but the role fiscal policy plays is just as important—if not more so. As I always say, government policy is a precursor to change, and very recently we saw this firsthand.

Only a day after President Barack Obama signed the spending deal Tuesday that lifted the oil export restriction that’s been in place since the mid-1970s, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rallied $2 and is now trading higher than its European counterpart, Brent, oil for the first time since 2010.

WTI Crude Oil Cross Above Brent Crude
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Time and again, when regulations are rolled back and markets are allowed to act freely, we see constructive moves such as the WTI rally. It’s much more significant than a 0.25 percent rate hike.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan was Instrumental in Passing the Spending Bill

Along with $1.1 trillion, the bipartisan deal includes $680 billion in tax cuts over the next decade, which should help accelerate the velocity of money and lead to the creation of new jobs. This is a positive development that wouldn’t have happened without the much-needed leadership of the new Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan.

It’s important for investors to follow the money in this case, just as it was important in February 2009 when the $800 billion stimulus package was signed into law. House Speaker Ryan was able to negotiate a reasonable extension to government spending and usher in a substantive tax incentive program as we head into 2016, an election year.

Top 10 Frank Talk Posts of 2015

As we head into the final days of 2015, I want to share with you the 10 most popular Frank Talks of the year. Among other things, they tell the story that gold, despite being oversold, managed to hold its value better than many other investments deemed “safe.” I’m optimistic to see what 2016 has in store for the yellow metal.

10. Show Me the Stocks, Not the Cash, Say Optimistic CEOs (May 4)

A growing trend among chief executives of successful companies is to be compensated in company stock rather than cash. In May we learned that American Airlines CEO Doug Parker elected to do just that.
“This is the right way for my compensation to be set,” Parker wrote, “at risk, based entirely on the results achieved.”

9. How These 12 TPP Nations Could Forever Change Global Growth (October 12)

One of the most significant news stories to come out of 2015 was the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) by 12 participating Pacific Rim nations, the United States among them. Many analysts believe that Vietnam is poised to see the biggest upside potential, as precipitously high tariffs on its important textiles, apparel and footwear exports will vanish.  

Vietnam Poised to Benefit Most From Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement
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8. China to Take Reins in Funding Regional Infrastructure Projects (March 31)

A similar development that’s likely to have huge global consequences is the establishment of the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), designed as a competitor to the U.S.-led International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank and Asian Development Bank (ADB).

Part of the reasoning behind China’s creation of the bank was to firm up the renminbi as a preferred global reserve currency on par with the U.S. dollar. And indeed, in late November the IMF voted to include the renminbi, also known as the yuan, in its Special Drawing Rights (SDR) currency basket.

7. Gold Holds Its Own Against These Media Darlings (August 10)

July 2015 was the seventh-worst-performing month for commodities going back to January 1970. Gold in particular was hit hard. But then in the week ended August 7, U.S. media companies took a huge dive, losing $60 billion for shareholders. Compared to that amount, gold managed to hold up well.

Media Stocks Collapse, Gold Hold Its Own
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6. Currency Wars Heat up as Central Banks Race to Cut Rates (February 2)

After Switzerland unexpectedly unpegged its currency from the euro in mid-January, it became clear that 2015 would be the year of the central banks. In that month alone, 14 countries cut interest rates and loosened borrowing standards. The U.S. stands as the only major economy, in fact, that has started to tighten its monetary policy.

5. Why We Invest in Royalty Companies (February 26)

One reason gold royalty companies have outperformed over the years is because, simply put, they’re not the ones getting their hands dirty. Their only obligation is to lend capital to the producers. Since its initial public offering (IPO) in 2007, Franco-Nevada, the world’s largest gold royalty company, has torn past both spot gold and most gold equity benchmarks.

Gold is Second Best Performing Currency of 2014
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4. Gold on Sale, Says the Rational Investor (August 3)

In late July, gold experienced its first “flash crash” in 18 months after five tonnes of the metal appeared on the Shanghai market. In what many called a “bear raid,” gold fell through its key support of around $1,150 and began to look extremely oversold.

Gold Price Falls Through Key Support Level
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3. Will Gold Finish 2015 with a Gain? (October 19)

In October, two events occurred almost simultaneously: The U.S. dollar signaled a “death cross”—meaning its 50-day moving average fell below its 200-day moving average—while gold broke above its 200-day moving average. At the time, it appeared as if gold might have a chance at doing something it hasn’t done since 2012—end the year in positive territory.

2. A Tale of Two Economies: Singapore and Cuba (March 28)

It’s almost impossible to believe now, but Cuba was once a wealthier nation than Singapore. But in 1959, Fidel Castro and Lee Kuan Yew both assumed power and took their countries in very different ideological and economic directions.

Yew, who passed away in March 2015, emphasizes free trade and competitive tax rates, which helped transform Singapore from an impoverished third world country into a bustling metropolis and leading global financial hub.

Lee Kuan Yew's Singapore Flourished while Fidel CAstro's Cuba Floundered
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1. Gold in the Age of Soaring Debt (June 18)

The world now sits beneath a mountain of debt worth an astonishing $200 trillion. That’s greater than twice the global GDP, which is currently $75 trillion. If we were to distribute this amount equally to every man, woman and child on the face of the earth, we would each owe around $28,000.

More surprising is that if gold—at its June 2015 price level—backed total global debt 100 percent, it would be valued at $33,900 per ounce.

Make sure to check out our most popular interactive favorites from 2015:

To all of our readers around the world, to our investors and shareholders, and to our friends and family, I wish you happiness and good health in the new year!

 

Some links above may be directed to third-party websites. U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by these websites and is not responsible for their content. All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 09/30/2015: American Airlines Group Inc., Franco-Nevada Corp, Time Warner Cable Inc.

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This Industry Is Set to Post Record Profits on Lower Fuel Costs
December 14, 2015

Global Airlines are Expected to Post a Collective $33 Billion in Net Profits This Year

Everyone knows there are winners and losers in any bear market, including the recent commodity rout. Low crude oil prices have definitely hurt explorers and producers. Airlines, on the other hand, appear to be thriving.

According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), a global airlines trade group, the industry is set to post a collective $33 billion in net profits this year—a record—on fuel cost savings and stronger passenger flight demand.

Want to know how significant a record this is? In 2014, profits came in at $17.4 billion—about half of what they are today.

What’s more, profits are expected to be even larger next year.

World demand grew 6.7 percent from a year ago, the IATA says, and is estimated to rise a further 6.9 percent in 2016. And with oil likely to stay relatively low, the group forecasts that airlines will spend $135 billion on fuel in 2016, down nearly a quarter from $180 billion in 2015.

This, coupled with improved fuel efficiency, is expected to contribute toward the group ending next year with estimated total net profits of $36.3 billion.

You can see below that global airline stocks have soared in recent years, especially in response to flagging oil, airlines’ largest expense.

Low Oil Prices Have Been a Huge Windfall for Airlines
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In the past, airlines were notorious for their inefficiency and tendency to destroy capital. These claims were probably exaggerated, especially by Warren Buffett, who has repeatedly decried the industry as a money-loser. What a lot of people don’t realize is that Buffett didn’t do as bad as he claimed.

Former US Airways CEO Ed Colodny explained in 2013 that after Buffett’s shares didn’t appreciate, he wrote down his investment and got out when he could.

“I think at the end of the day, he got all his dividends paid and his principal back,” Colodny said.  

In any case, airlines are now going into their third year of the present secular bull market. These often last much longer. We believe this cycle is different, in that the U.S. airline industry could easily create $20 billion of free cash flow this year and next. Low fuel costs have been the cherry on top.

Where Does Oil Go from Here?

Bloomberg Businessweek

Indeed, 2015 was not kind to oil and other commodities, with many of them slumping to multiyear and, in some cases, multi-decade lows.

Back in August, the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek featured a whole gaggle of bears, which delighted bulls. (There’s an old belief that the market will soon do the exact opposite of what the press predicts.) Yet here we are four months out, and the commodities rout has only extended itself further.

Crude oil is presently testing financial crisis support levels, making many investors wonder whether the bottom for black gold has been reached—or if more pain is to be expected.

There’s no shortage of analysts and experts right now sharing their (wildly divergent) predictions of where oil might be headed from here. Some are calling for $20 per barrel; others, such as legendary hedge fund manager T. Boone Pickens, $70 or more in the next six months.

We can’t say whether Pickens is right or wrong. It’s worth pointing out, though, that crude has pretty closely followed its five-year trading pattern, with 52-week lows reached in late November, early December. The short-term trend shows oil rallying sharply starting in January, according to Moore Research analysis.

West Texas Crude: Historical Patterns
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Here’s another way of looking at it. The following heat map shows that, in the last five years, the oil price historically popped in February after months of losses. What this means is that January might be a good time to buy.

Average Crude Oil Price Change by Month
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The oscillator below confirms that. Right now crude is down 1.2 standard deviations—already signaling a buy, but it might have further to fall, based on past incidences.

Average Crude Oil Price Change by Month
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One of the more balanced perspectives comes from energy strategist Dr. Kent Moors, who tempers his optimism with a dose of reality:

The Five Most Searched-For Trends by Visitors to ETFdb.com Right Now
We are not racing back to $100 a barrel oil. Absent the outlier of a geopolitical event that impacts supply, more subdued rises are in order. But we certainly do not need triple-digit oil to make some nice investment returns, especially in a sector that has been so oversold.

I agree. I’m not interested in adding my own forecast to the ever-lengthening list so much as I am in finding ways to make money at current prices.

As are other investors. Based on the most searched-for trends on ETFdb.com right now, you can clearly see what’s on their minds.

OPEC Members Revolt against Saudis as Oil Slips

One of the main reasons why prices are so depressed, of course, is that the world is awash in the stuff. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), responsible for about 40 percent of global supply, just had its most productive month since 2012, pumping 31.7 million barrels in November. That’s 1.7 million barrels over its “official” production ceiling.

Crude slipped below $37 per barrel on the news, a seven-year low, which is about as low as prices can go for most American companies to stay profitable. (As of this writing, WTI crude sits at $35.20, Brent at $36.83.)

Brent Crude Oil Hasn't Hit 2008 Lows
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As expected, OPEC announced after its last meeting that it would keep oil production levels the same in its bid to force higher-cost producers (re: American frackers) to trim their own operations. Solidarity among its members has weakened further, however, as it becomes clearer and clearer to them that they underestimated the resilience of American oil producers.

Five OPEC members—Venezuela, Nigeria, Libya, Iran and Ecuador—are now in open opposition to the Saudi policy of unchanged production. That the cartel as a whole exceeded its production ceiling last month suggests that each member-nation is making its own rules up anyway, regardless of what was decided.

It’s estimated that OPEC is already pumping about 900,000 barrels a day more than is needed next year. And with international sanctions against Iran about to be lifted—in exchange for an agreement to halt its nuclear program—the country has promised to increase its own production from 3.3 million barrels a day to as many as 4 million barrels a day by the end of 2016.

OPEC is pumping 900,000 barrels of oil a day more than the world needs.

Venezuela in particular is in deep turmoil. Low oil prices have battered its currency and left its economy in tatters, with food shortages worsening every day. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) expects the South American country—which has the largest proven oil reserves in the world—to contract 10 percent this year and has declared it the worst-performing economy in the world right now.

In the recent parliamentary elections, rightfully fed-up Venezuelans responded by ousting members of Hugo Chavez’s United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV), giving the opposition party, the more-centrist Democratic Unity Roundtable (MUD), a supermajority that could challenge President Nicolás Maduro.

This countrywide rejection of failed, far-left leadership is an encouraging sign that Latin America’s political ideology is finally shifting away from European-style socialist economic models of no growth. We’ve seen South American countries tax away growth and impose envy policies on the financial sector. Mining and oil executives have seen their cash flow confiscated by value-added taxes, leading to drops in capex and job creation.

But just last month we saw Argentina elect its first business-friendly president, Mauricio Macri, in decades. And now Venezuela is demanding change, so there’s hope.

As head of the cartel, Saudi Arabia hasn’t gone unscathed in the oil rout either. For the first time, the kingdom will tap international bond markets to make up for lost oil revenues.

Also in the hard-to-believe category is Alaska’s plan to institute an income tax for the first time in 35 years to “close a $3.5 billion dollar deficit the state is carrying,” according to Zero Hedge. The Last Frontier is known, of course, for giving all Alaskan residents an annual dividend based on oil revenue. In 2015, that amount was $2,072.

But since oil revenue has been cut in half, hard measures must be taken to keep the dividend running, Alaska Governor Bill Walker argues.

“This plan keeps the permanent fund permanent,” Walker tweeted last Wednesday.

And Yet Oil Demand Is Still Outpacing Supply

Crude oil reserves here in the U.S. are currently at levels not seen since 1972. That’s with a 65 percent decline in rigs in operation from a year ago, a clear indicator of how efficient American producers have become.

U.S. Crude Oil Stocks Still at High Capacity
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But some analysts have suggested the oversupply isn’t as bad as we might think. Tom Kloza, head of energy analysis at the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) told CNBC this week that it’s important to think of oil supply in the context of population growth:

This is a glut in terms of the most crude oil we’ve ever had in North America. But if you measure it versus the population, it’s not altogether that much. We’ve had much more crude-per-population back in previous decades.

Kloza has a fair point. In 1970, at the height of U.S. oil production, the country’s population was just over 205 million and the total number of registered vehicles—passenger cars, motorcycles, trucks and buses—was 111 million, according to the Department of Transportation. Today the population hovers just north of 319 million and, as of 2013, the number of registered vehicles has more than doubled to 255 million.

World Crude Oil Demand Not Slowing Down
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It’s worth reminding ourselves that the U.S. isn’t the only growing country. Population is booming all over the globe. People continue to have babies—Chinese couples even more so now that the one-child policy has been lifted—and the global middle class is swelling rapidly. This helps oil demand continue to rise, as well as air travel demand.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The NYSE Arca Airline Index (XAL) is an equal dollar weighted index designed to measure the performance of highly capitalized companies in the airline industry. The XAL Index tracks the price performance of major U.S. and overseas airlines.

Standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of a set of data from its mean. The more spread apart the data, the higher the deviation. Standard deviation is also known as historical volatility.

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Why Argentina’s New Leader Is Good for Latin America and Global Investors
November 30, 2015

President-elect Mauricio Macri promises to bring market-friendly policies to Argentina.

It might be hard to believe now, but Argentina once ranked among the top 10 wealthiest nations in the world, following the United Kingdom, United States and Australia.

Today, however, it’s one of the most corrupt, according to Transparency International, a group that annually measures public sector corruption around the world. In 2014, Argentina ranked 107, sandwiched between Niger and Djibouti.

That’s largely because for more than half a century, Argentina has been led almost exclusively by the far-left Justicialist Party, based on the political thought of Juan Perón—an admirer of Mussolini—and his wife Evita.

But this week, Argentina said “no, gracias” to further leftist rule when it elected conservative businessman and two-term Buenos Aires mayor Mauricio Macri to succeed Cristina Fernández de Kirchner as president. It was an upset victory for the people of Argentina, who have seen their once-prosperous nation deteriorate under decades of Marxist policies.

It was also a strong win for investors around the globe. Not since Narendra Modi’s election last year has a leader’s entry on the world stage inspired such bullishness.

In the three months leading up to the November 22 election, Argentina’s Merval Index rose 30 percent as optimistic investors anticipated a win by Macri.

Argentina Presidential Election Drove Investor Confidence
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Last week I was in San Francisco speaking at the Silver Summit & Resource Expo, where many fund managers commented that their Argentine holdings had seen huge jumps recently. Many people I spoke with there were bullish on the country.

Latin America Veering Right to Escape Corruption

I join many others in expressing my belief that this change in leadership points to an ideological shift in Latin America and a rejection of the Peronism that has threatened to turn the region into an also-ran economy. I’m confident that once Argentina demonstrates to its neighbors that market-friendly policies stir economic growth and help lead to widespread prosperity, the people of Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela and others will demand similar corruption-free leadership.

Chavez's daughter, Maria Gabriela, is worth an estimated $4.2 billion.

In Venezuela—which is slightly less corrupt than the likes of Yemen, Libya and Iraq, according to Transparency International—the people are still reeling from Hugo Chávez’s disastrous administration. With food shortages and hunger worsening, the government implemented fingerprint scanners in grocery stores last year to limit purchases of basic goods.

This, despite Chávez—a leader who was supposed to be “for the people”—being worth an estimated $2 billion at the time of his death two years ago. It’s believed that he stole much of his wealth from the country’s oil industry. Today, his daughter Maria Gabriela is the wealthiest woman in Venezuela, worth double that.

In August, global intelligence company Stratfor conducted an analysis of satellite imagery taken of Puerto Cabello, Venezuela’s main port of entry for imports, between February 2012 and June 2015. The visible reduction in food container traffic is alarming.

Meanwhile, in Peru, First Lady Nadine Heredia is being investigated for money laundering and the usurpation of public functions. When I was in country earlier this month speaking at the Mining & Investment Latin America Summit, there was a lot of discussion on rule of law and corruption in Peru and surrounding South American countries. It’s estimated that stolen public money in Peru adds up to about 2 percent of GDP annually.

Latin Americans are increasingly saying enough is enough.

“What happened in Argentina was the first change in Latin America,” said former Brazil finance minister Maílson da Nóbrega, speaking to the Wall Street Journal. “It may be the start of a downfall in populist governments. I think the next one should be Venezuela. And I think Brazil will follow suit in 2018.”

Brazil President Dilma Rousseff, who won reelection last year, currently has an approval rating in the single digits. As I shared with you last month, her Marxist policies have suffocated business development. The country tumbled 18 points this year in the annual Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) and is now considered to be one of the worst in terms of burdensome government regulations and unethical business practices. The people of Brazil deserve better.

This is part of the reason why I believe active management is so important. When I travel around the world and talk to different people, I obtain and return with tacit knowledge that can’t be found by simply reading Bloomberg.

Macri Bucks the Trend

In this troubling context, Mauricio Macri is a breath of fresh air. He’s not what most people envision when they’re asked to describe the stereotypical South American leader. Unlike Fidel Castro, Chávez, Rousseff and others, Macri never served as a Marxist guerilla in his youth. There are no pictures of him posing heroically in a steaming jungle, attired in military garb like fellow Argentine Che Guevara. Macri’s more likely to be found playing a friendly game of soccer than delivering a rousing hours-long speech from a balcony. By most accounts, he’s contemplative and soft-spoken.

But change is precisely what Argentina needs now. For the last 12 years, former President Néstor Kirchner and, following his death, wife Cristina managed only to cripple the country’s economy even further. The size of the state doubled in the last 10 years alone. Entire industries were nationalized, taxing and spending skyrocketed, foreign investment fled and inflation exploded at an average pace of 20 percent a year.

20 Years of Wild Inflation: Argentina vs. the United States
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Under these conditions, holding gold in Argentina pesos has been a good bet for investors.

Price of Gold Per Ounce in Argentina Pesos
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Realistic or not, Macri has vowed to roll back many policies from previous administrations. He also plans to cultivate a warmer business climate with Brazil, Argentina’s top trading partner, and staunch the outflow of foreign capital. Last year, $2 billion left the country, a 75 percent increase from 2013, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Which is a shame. Argentina has a huge amount of untapped potential—a highly educated population, the fastest-growing middle class in Latin America and an abundance of natural resources.

Here’s hoping Macri’s administration can succeed at fostering a more welcome environment for business, one that might benefit the Argentine people and global investors alike.

From Pump to Plate: Low Fuel Costs Help Americans Spend Less on Thanksgiving Dinner

Argentina Presidential Election Drove Investor Confidence

As Argentina is facing steep inflation, American consumers today are spending a little less on essentials such as food—more specifically, Thanksgiving dinner.

According to the Texas Farm Bureau’s Thanksgiving Meal Report, a typical spread of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and more cost $46.48 this year, down 31 cents from 2014.

(The one Thanksgiving staple we spent more on this year was pecans. They’re up 11 percent as China’s appetite for the nut has increased.)

The reason for the savings? Lower fuel and grain prices. As a whole, grains are down about 11.5 percent from a year ago, while crude oil is off more than 36 percent. According to AAA’s Fuel Gauge Report, gas averages $2.05 per gallon right now, a 27 percent decline from this time last year.

As I’ve been saying since last December, this “oil peace dividend” is helping us save not only at the gas pump but also the grocery store and elsewhere.

Additionally, AAA estimates that 46.9 million Americans travelled 50 or more miles this Thanksgiving holiday, the highest travel volume since 2007. Because of lower fuel costs, more Americans evidently felt as if they could afford to travel longer distances to visit Grandma and Grandpa. A spokesman for AAA says that motorists are currently saving about $11 on every full tank of gas compared to this time last year.

What Is Janet Yellen Thinking?

Speaking of saving, Americans are saving at the highest levels since 2012. At the same time, personal spending is slowing GDP growth.

That’s according to a new report by investment advisor Strategic International Securities (SIS), which writes that it believes a rate hike next month is unlikely.

“The Federal Reserve needs to keep real interest rates at zero to set the equilibrium between the demand and supply for money in the economy,” SIS strategist Philip L. Miller says. “This further implies in order to keep investment where it is already making up for nearly 30 percent in the trend GDP shortfall, the Fed believes it needs to keep real rates at zero to sustain the current anemic levels of private investment or they may falter even more.”

In addition, BCA Research reports that the Fed is no closer to achieving its key 2 percent inflation goal than it was at the beginning of the year. Inflation expectations, in fact, are shifting down. The Fed’s preferred measure of inflation, core PCE, has remained stuck at 1.3 percent all year.

We won’t know what Yellen’s thinking until December 15, but whether or not she decides to raise rates, it might be a good time to consider tax-free, short-term municipal bonds. Shorter-term, quality munis are less sensitive to rate increase than longer-term bonds that are locked into rates for greater periods of time.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The MERVAL Index is the most important index of the Buenos Aires Stock Exchange. It is a price-weighted index, calculated as the market value of a portfolio of stocks selected based on their market share, number of transactions and quotation price. The Mexican IPC index (Indice de Precios y Cotizaciones) is a capitalization weighted index of the leading stocks traded on the Mexican Stock Exchange. The Santiago Stock Exchange IPSA Index is a total return index and is composed of the 40 stocks with the highest average annual trading volume in the Santiago Stock Exchange (Bolsa de Comercio de Santiago). The index has been calculated since 1977 and is revised on a quarterly basis. The Bovespa Index is an index of about 50 stocks that are traded on the São Paulo Stock, Mercantile & Futures Exchange. It is composed by a theoretical portfolio with the stocks that accounted for 80% of the volume traded in the last 12 months and that were traded at least on 80% of the trading days. It's revised quarterly, in order to keep its representativeness of the volume traded and in average the components of Ibovespa represent 70% of the all the stock value traded.

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What We’re Paying Attention to Following the Paris Attacks
November 23, 2015

Ten days ago, 129 lives were brutally cut short when assailants affiliated with the terrorist group ISIS, also known as the Islamic State, stormed Paris in a series of coordinated attacks. Along with the rest of the world, we were shocked and saddened as the tragic news unfolded, worsening as the night progressed. Our thoughts are with the victims’ families and friends.

For us, the atrocity struck especially close to home, as one of our portfolio managers, Xian Liang, was in the city at the time of the attacks. We’re extremely grateful he and his wife returned home safe and sound. I wish the same could be said for the victims in Paris that day, the 224 on the Russian jet brought down by an ISIS-built bomb, the hostages in Mali Friday, and many others whose lives have been affected by the global scourge of terrorism.

We Take Our Role as Fiduciaries Seriously

As money managers, it’s our duty and responsibility to be cognizant of such geopolitical events—large and small, good and bad—and to consider all of the possible ramifications. The consequences often reach far and wide, and can be felt in the short-term (changes in investor confidence) as well as the long-term (changes in government policy).

Early last year, for instance, we were quick to adjust asset allocations when Russia invaded and annexed Crimea. We anticipated that sanctions would be imposed on the country, and indeed they were, by the U.S., European Union, Australia and other international organizations. These sanctions, coupled with falling oil prices, contributed to the Russian ruble’s dramatic breakdown.

Diesel, the seven-year-old belgian shepherd who was killed recently during a French SWAT raid

Against these challenges, I’m impressed by how strongly Russian stocks have performed lately. Last Tuesday, the Micex Index jumped to an eight-month high in ruble terms. This is especially interesting since both Brent oil and the ruble are way down. It suggests that investors are showing approval of President Vladimir Putin’s involvement in Syria.

Putin is also benefiting from a strong public relations push. The Daily Mail writes: “Russia has shown its solidarity with the people of France in an unusual way—by donating a new puppy to carry on the memory of Diesel, the police dog killed by a suicide bomber.”

It should come as a surprise to no one that, following the tragedy in Paris, defense spending will likely increase. French President François Hollande has already told Parliament that France is at war and will “be merciless” in its pursuit of justice. The country wasted no time in striking back against ISIS and has begun bombing raids in Syria.

As early as last Monday, stocks of companies that manufacture weapons and fighter jets traded up.

War Stocks Rally Following Attacks in Paris
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We own Lockheed Martin, manufacturer of the F-35, F-22 and F-16 fighters; Boeing, manufacturer of the Tomahawk cruise missile, F-18 fighter and more; and Northrop Grumman, which was recently awarded the contract to build America’s next generation of long-range strike bombers. Raytheon develops and manufactures guided missiles.

The U.S. Navy plans to buy more Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets in the coming years.

International Travel to Be Hit

Understandably so, the terrorist attacks will have an impact on international travel, immigration and border security. France immediately tightened its borders, and other European countries quickly followed suit. Meanwhile, Poland’s newly-elected government rejected the European Union’s quotas for accepting refugees from Syria, an attitude that’s echoed by more than 30 U.S. states. The House of Representatives just passed legislation to suspend the admittance of 10,000 Syrian refugees, though it’s likely to be vetoed.

This is the climate we find ourselves in right now. It has a huge effect, at least in the near-term, on perceptions of international travel.

“Most people are risk-averse,” Xian says. “When my wife and I left for the airport by taxi the morning after the Paris attacks, we agreed not to travel to Europe again any time soon.”

Others share Xian’s attitude. Paris has for years been the world’s top tourist destination, but the City of Lights has already seen a huge drop-off in tourists as people have delayed or cancelled travel plans. Hotel stocks were up 10 percent in October but will likely face headwinds as a result of Paris and Mali.

Gold, Diamond and Oil Declines Good for Manufacturers

Xian stresses the importance of having gold exposure as diversification. A good diversifier is any investment that’s expected to have a low correlation with the rest of your portfolio, and gold historically has little to no correlation with equities.

The yellow metal has traditionally been seen as a safe haven in times of war, but so far we’ve seen little movement. Year-to-date, gold is down nearly 9 percent, and it could possibly end 2015 in negative territory for the third straight year.

Even so, the yellow metal has performed better than other select world currencies for the year, including the Russian ruble (-10 percent), Australian dollar (-11 percent), euro (-12 percent) and Canadian dollar (-13 percent).

Gold and Diamonds Follow the Same Downtrend
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Diamonds have likewise struggled over the past four years, but with the recent news that Canadian miner Lucara discovered the largest diamond in 100 years, investors might show renewed interest. The massive 1,111-carat diamond was unearthed in Lucara’s Botswana project. Although the stone has yet to be assessed, it’s worth noting for comparison that a 100-carat diamond sold at Sotheby’s in April for $22 million.   

Gold and Diamonds Follow the Same Downward Trend
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These declines over the past three and four years have been good for jewelry companies such as Tiffany, which I wrote about last December. Gold and diamond supply is now less expensive, so the company has margin expansion.

The same can be said of oil. Low prices have hurt South Texas, the Middle East, Russia and Colombia, not to mention drillers and explorers, but they’ve been a windfall for the end consumer, including manufacturers and airlines. Falling energy prices are finding their way into the global engine of growth.

$500 Billion Peace Dividend for Global Consumers and Businesses
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Many analysts expect to see crude oil prices tick up on mounting tension in the Middle East. During past military engagements, oil has typically performed well since a lot is required to fight a war. We haven’t seen prices move just yet—oil still sits at $40 per barrel—but it’s something we’ll monitor closely. As I said earlier this month, the global purchasing managers’ index (PMI) turned up in October after bottoming in September, and in the past this has been followed by a jump in oil prices.

Oil Trends Typically Drive by Global Economic Activity
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Inflation Rousing from Sleep

We learned this week that the consumer price index (CPI) rose 0.2 percent in October, suggesting that inflation is finally picking up steam in the U.S. and giving the Federal Reserve further excuses to raise rates next month.

Based on the 2-year Treasury yield (0.89 percent) and the headline CPI (0.20 percent), real rates now stand at 0.69 percent. (Real interest rates are what you get when you subtract the CPI from the Federal funds rate.) I’ve often explained that gold responds positively when real rates turn negative, as you can clearly see in the chart below, so we’re eagerly awaiting stronger inflation.

Real Interest Rates and Gold Share an Inverse Relationship
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In a note this week, Drew Matus, an economist at UBS, wrote that inflation in the U.S. is poised to jump in the next couple of months. The CPI measures the price of a basket of goods to the price of the same goods a year ago, so inflation fell dramatically between November 2014 and January 2015 as energy prices plunged.

But “absent a similar move this year, those sharp price declines will drop out of the year-over-year data, resulting in a rapid, technical acceleration in overall inflation measure,” Matus says.

If such inflation occurs—possibly as soon as January or February, Matus points out—real rates could have a better chance of dipping into negative territory, which would be constructive for gold prices.

Thanksgiving is this week, and in light of recent events, I think we all have ample reason to express gratitude to friends and loved ones. Everyone have a blessed week!  

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Fund portfolios are actively managed, and holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more of U.S. Global Investors Funds as of 9/30/2015: Lockheed Martin Corp., The Boeing Co., Northrop Grumman Corp., Lucara Diamond Corp.

The MICEX Index is the real-time cap-weighted Russian composite index.  It comprises 30 most liquid stocks of Russian largest and most developed companies from 10 main economy sectors.  The MICEX Index was launched on September 22, 1997, base value 100.  The MICEX Index is calculated and disseminated by the MICEX Stock Exchange, the main Russian stock exchange.

The J.P. Morgan Global Purchasing Manager’s Index is an indicator of the economic health of the global manufacturing sector. The PMI index is based on five major indicators: new orders, inventory levels, production, supplier deliveries and the employment environment.

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Net Asset Value
as of 11/24/2017

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $6.07 0.10 Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $7.39 0.03 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $5.78 0.02 China Region Fund USCOX $11.95 -0.23 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $7.07 -0.02 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $24.08 0.02 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $21.36 No Change Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.21 No Change U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $2.00 No Change