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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

New Economic Report Card Shows that the U.S. Still Has the Competitive Edge
October 16, 2014

America’s still got it.

That’s according to the latest Global Competitiveness Report, which names the U.S. the third-most competitive nation in the world, our highest ranking since 2008.

For 10 years now the World Economic Forum (WEF) has published its annual competitiveness report, which assesses the strength of 144 countries’ 12 “pillars,” including institutions, infrastructure, health and primary education and higher education. It then ranks these countries based on their overall ability to promote prosperity for their citizens.

Singapore retains its number two spot for the fourth straight year, while Switzerland leads for the sixth year in a row.

Top 20 Countries in 2013 - 2014 Global Competiveness Index
click to enlarge

From 2006 until 2008, the U.S. held the top position, but following the financial crisis, our ranking slipped to number seven in 2012.

This year, the WEF notes:

“U.S. companies are highly sophisticated and innovative, and they are supported by an excellent university system... Combined with flexible labor markets and the scale opportunities afforded by the sheer size of its domestic economy—the world’s largest by far—these qualities make the United States very competitive.”

You might be thinking: But wait, didn’t China’s economy just exceed our own?

Yes and no.

It’s true that, when U.S. and China’s economies are not adjusted for costs of living, the U.S. is still “the world’s largest by far.” Our GDP stands at around $16.8 trillion whereas China’s is $9.3 trillion.

But based on purchasing power parity (PPP), a calculation that factors in relative costs of living to make comparisons between and among countries “fairer,” China has indeed caught up with and surpassed the U.S.

China's Economy Surpasses the U.S.'s Based on Purchasing Power Parity
click to enlarge

This news might bruise some readers’ egos, but it’s actually a tailwind for both commodities and our China Region Fund (USCOX). China is such an important player in the global economy that it’s nearly impossible for any serious investor to see China’s ascent as anything but positive.

Below are some of the key takeaways from the Global Competitiveness Report.

Strengths

The economic report card gives the U.S. many accolades, including its capacity to attract and retain talented people from abroad. I always say that when people want to innovate and start businesses, they typically come here to the United States. The report reveals it’s relatively easy in the U.S. for “entrepreneurs with innovative but risky projects to find venture capital.” Our financial services are strong, and we have ready access to bank loans for sound business plans. When it comes to the ease of raising money by issuing shares on the stock market, we come in at sixth place, following Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Africa, New Zealand and Qatar.

The United States ranks high in company spending on research and development.Only Switzerland beats us in our capacity for innovation.

We score very well in our availability and corporate adoption of the latest technologies, as well as availability of scientists and engineers, quality of scientific research institutions and company spending on R&D. We rank eleventh in the number of patent applications filed under the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), amounting to 149.8 per one million U.S. citizens.

In the business sophistication pillar, we excel above all other countries in our use of sophisticated marketing tools and techniques.

Areas for Improvement

It comes as no surprise that the top three most problematic factors for doing business in the U.S., according to the report, are tax rates, tax regulations and inefficient government bureaucracy. It’s for these reasons that some businesses, including Burger King, Medtronic and Chiquita, are in the process of moving their corporate headquarters to countries with friendlier tax rates—Ireland, Canada and Singapore, among others.

High tax rates, burdensome regulations and inefficient government bureaucracy are all cited as "problematic factors" for doing business in the U.S.To prevent such tax inversions from occurring, our tax code sorely needs amending. Our 35-percent corporate income tax rate is the highest among the 34 member nations of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and we actually rank 32 out of 34 in the 2014 International Tax Competitiveness Index. Only Portugal and France fare worse.

Indeed, the Global Competitiveness Report shows that, to a large extent, taxes reduce the incentive to work: in this department we come in at number 37, just between China and Ghana. As for wastefulness of government spending, we rank number 73, trailing France by one point and China by 49 points. The report also shows that it can often be difficult for some businesses to comply with U.S. government regulations.

If our government were to simplify the tax code and ease regulations, there’s no doubt that the U.S. could once again claim top honor.

Other crucial areas for improvement include quality of electrical supply (we come in at number 24, following Barbados), soundness of banks (number 49), gross domestic secondary enrollment rate (59) and quality of math and science education (51).

Emerging Countries 

Some of the emerging markets that we track at U.S. Global Investors either made gains this year or maintained their positions.

Poland, for instance, held on to its rank of 43. The WEF noted the country’s “improvements… in institutions, infrastructure and education,” its “increased flexibility in labor market efficiency” and its “[c]ontinued structural reforms geared toward strengthening its innovation and knowledge-driven economy.” A well-educated population and secure financial market make Poland globally competitive, but to truly boost its innovative capacity, it needs to improve its infrastructure, soften regulations and make settling business disputes more efficient.

Greece jumped 10 spots to reach the rank of 81. Despite its high levels of government debt, the Mediterranean country has managed to improve the functioning of its goods and labor markets and reduce its budget deficit. However, its government is still inefficient and its financial market has yet to recover from the recent crisis that hit parts of Europe. A lack of access to financing is the most problematic factor for doing business in Greece.

Other key emerging markets that rose up the list were China, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Keep Investing in America

Despite a few areas for improvement, the United States is still the preeminent place on earth to invest, with plenty of openings for growth. As we continue to recover from the recession, now is the most opportune time in years to place your trust in America’s future.

Our two U.S. equity funds, All American Equity Fund (GBTFX) and Holmes Macro Trends Fund (MEGAX), have been impacted by the global economic slowdown and growth scare. Cyclical stocks—the kind we focus on in these two funds—have lagged defensive stocks, by about 6 percent in the last month and a half.

Cyclicals are those types of goods and services consumers can afford to purchase when the economy is performing well. Examples include discretionary-type companies such as Apple, Priceline and Tesla Motors. Defensives, on the other hand, typically remain stable, even in times of market downturns. Examples include electricity, gas and food.

Cyclical Stocks Have Dropped 6 Percent in Last Month-and-a-Half Compared to Defensive Stocks
click to enlarge

This might sound like troubling news, but we view it as an opportunity. As you can see, a similar discrepancy between cyclical and defensive stocks occurred in April and May of last year, and yet mean reversion corrected it. We’re optimistic that such a turn will occur again, which means that now might be an ideal time to accumulate cyclicals.

Our Near-Term Tax Free Fund invests in the schools that keep America competitive.Another way to potentially capitalize on our nation’s successes is U.S. Global Investors’ Near-Term Tax Free Fund (NEARX), which invests in high-quality, U.S. municipal bonds. A significant portion of the fund is invested in health services, public schools and higher education, three of the 12 pillars that the WEF assesses. To keep these services operational and efficient, state and local governments rely on funding from the very bonds we invest in, which in turn improves Americans’ livelihood as well as the businesses they run.

Although past performance is no guarantee of future results, NEARX has delivered positive tax-free income for the past 13 years. The fund seeks preservation of capital and has demonstrated minimal fluctuation in its share price, with a net asset value (NAV) that has floated in the $2 range.

Near-Term Tax Free Fund Annual Total Return
click to enlarge

Because of its risk-adjusted returns, NEARX has earned the coveted five-star rating from Morningstar* for the five-year performance period and four stars overall. Check out its performance here.

To learn more about how you can help keep the United States competitive, I encourage you to request an information packet.

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Distributed by U.S. Global Brokerage, Inc.

Quarter End Average Annual Total Returns as of 09/30/2014
YTD 1
Year
5
Year
10
Year
Since
Inception
Gross
Expense
Ratio
Expense
Ratio
After Waivers
2.66% 3.26% 2.59% 2.97% 4.22% 1.21% 0.45%

Expense ratio as stated in the most recent prospectus. The expense ratio after waivers is a contractual limit through December 31, 2015, for the Near-Term Tax Free Fund, on total fund operating expenses (exclusive of acquired fund fees and expenses, extraordinary expenses, taxes, brokerage commissions and interest). Performance data quoted above is historical. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Results reflect the reinvestment of dividends and other earnings. For a portion of periods, the fund had expense limitations, without which returns would have been lower. Current performance may be higher or lower than the performance data quoted. The principal value and investment return of an investment will fluctuate so that your shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Performance does not include the effect of any direct fees described in the fund's prospectus which, if applicable, would lower your total returns. Performance quoted for periods of one year or less is cumulative and not annualized. Obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end at www.usfunds.com or 1-800-US-FUNDS.

Morningstar Rating

Overall/164
3-Year/164
5-Year/137
10-Year/103

Morningstar ratings based on risk-adjusted return and number of funds
Category: Municipal National Short-Term Funds
Through: 09/30/2014

Bond funds are subject to interest-rate risk; their value declines as interest rates rise. Tax-exempt income is federal income tax free. A portion of this income may be subject to state and local income taxes, and if applicable, may subject certain investors to the Alternative Minimum Tax as well. The Near-Term Tax Free Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in securities that pay taxable interest. Income or fund distributions attributable to capital gains are usually subject to both state and federal income taxes. The Near-Term Tax Free Fund may be exposed to risks related to a concentration of investments in a particular state or geographic area. These investments present risks resulting from changes in economic conditions of the region or issuer. Though the Near-Term Tax Free Fund seeks minimal fluctuations in share price, it is subject to the risk that a decline in the credit quality of a portfolio holding could cause a fund’s share price to decline. Stock markets can be volatile and can fluctuate in response to sector-related or foreign-market developments. For details about these and other risks the Holmes Macro Trends Fund may face, please refer to the fund’s prospectus. Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. By investing in a specific geographic region, a regional fund’s returns and share price may be more volatile than those of a less concentrated portfolio.

Morningstar Ratings are based on risk-adjusted return. The Morningstar Rating for a fund is derived from a weighted-average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five- and ten-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. Past performance does not guarantee future results. For each fund with at least a three-year history, Morningstar calculates a Morningstar Ratingä based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a fund’s monthly performance (including the effects of sales charges, loads, and redemption fees), placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. The top 10% of funds in each category receive 5 stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. (Each share class is counted as a fraction of one fund within this scale and rated separately, which may cause slight variations in the distribution percentages.)

The Global Competitiveness Index, developed for the World Economic Forum, is used to assess competitiveness of nations. The Index is made up of over 113 variables, organized into 12 pillars, with each pillar representing an area considered as an important determinant of competitiveness: institutions, infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, health and primary education, higher education and training, goods market efficiency, labor market efficiency, financial market sophistication, technological readiness, market size, business sophistication and innovation.

The Tax Foundation’s International Tax Competitiveness Index (ITCI) measures the degree to which the 34 OECD countries’ tax systems promote competitiveness through low tax burdens on business investment and neutrality through a well-structured tax code. The ITCI considers more than forty variables across five categories: Corporate Taxes, Consumption Taxes, Property Taxes, Individual Taxes, and International Tax Rules.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Fund portfolios are actively managed, and holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. Holdings in the funds mentioned as a percentage of net assets as of 09/30/2014: Burger King (0.00%), Medtronic (0.00%), Chiquita (0.00%), Apple, Inc. (4.35% in All American Equity Fund, 4.56% in Holmes Macro Trends Fund), The Priceline Group, Inc. (3.00% in All American Equity Fund, 3.03% in Holmes Macro Trends Fund), Tesla Motors, Inc. (2.09% in All American Equity Fund, 2.93% in Holmes Macro Trends Fund).  

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

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Warning: Market Correction Last Week… Did You See the Opportunity?
October 13, 2014

While stocks fell around the world last week amid growing concerns over global economic growth, Europe’s slowdown can’t stop emerging market population growth that drives long-term commodity demand. If the short-term market volatility concerns you, a solution is short-term tax-free municipal bonds. Check out the 5 Reasons Why.

Last week we saw a continued selloff in energy stocks and a slump in commodity prices, specifically oil. In light of this, I've highlighted some key points portfolio manager Brian Hicks and I made during our latest webcast that might offer investors some clarity and insight into our management strategy when such market nervousness occurs.

Everything that appears in italics is commentary from the webcast.

PMI: Commodities’ Crystal Ball

You look at the stock market as a precursor to economic activity six months out. If you’re looking at commodities, you must be looking at PMIs.

JP Morgan Global Manufacturing Purchasing Managers' Index
click to enlarge

What our research has shown is that there is a 60- to 80-percent probability of commodities and commodity stocks rising when the global PMI’s one-month reading is above the three-month trend. When its one-month is below the three-months, there is a high probability of these sectors and stocks falling over the next six months.

Commodities and Commodity Stocks Historically Rose Six Months After PMI CrossOver
click to enlarge

The global PMI reading is a composite of each country’s unique PMI. So we look at individual countries and try to gauge what their monetary and fiscal policies are going to be. These government policies have a high correlation to commodity demand, which is significant to resource investments.

Brian Hicks

Brian HicksBrian Hicks, portfolio manager of our Global Resources Fund (PSPFX), stepped in to share his thoughts on the resources sector, devoting special attention to the recent performance of crude oil.

Despite the recent selloff, I believe it’s actually an excellent time to be looking at resource stocks and energy stocks in particular.

 

 

The Polarity of the Dollar and Crude Oil

The following chart mathematically depicts the oversold nature of crude oil:

Year-Over-Year Percent Change Oscillator: S&P 1500 Energy vs. U.S. Dollar
click to enlarge

The dollar is significantly overbought relative to crude oil. The dollar is up almost two standard deviations, crude oil down almost one standard deviation. History has shown, whether it’s in 2011 or 2012, that this has been a good time to buy crude oil.

Natural Resources Stocks Priced to Move

Another factor that gets me excited about these energy stocks and natural resource stocks is the metrics that we’re seeing from a fundamental standpoint. Looking at the top 50 holdings for our Global Resources Fund, what jumps out immediately is just how cheap these stocks are relative to their growth rate, trading at 20 times in the last quarter earnings. Sales were growing at over 20 percent.

Global-Resources-Fund-Portfolio-Construction
click to enlarge

These companies are very profitable, generating return on equity of 25 percent, paying a dividend yield on average—about 2.7 percent—and growing that dividend at about a 30-percent click. And as you can see, these stocks have outperformed the S&P 500 Index so far year-to-date (YTD), even with this pullback.

A Thirst for Oil

Looking at global oil demand, you can see it’s been unrelenting through recessions, through bull markets, bear markets, and it looks like it’s going to continue to go up at a fairly steady level based on latest data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

Global Oil Demand Reaching New Highs
click to enlarge

Below is a very important point to consider. Where oil prices are now, we’re getting to the area where production could be cut off because prices are not high enough to incentivize new development, new production and new drilling.

2015 U.S. Tight Oil Production by Incentive Price
click to enlarge

If you look at crude oil price somewhere in the area of $80 to $90, we have about 650,000 barrels per day of production that need to be supported at that particular level. So we really can’t go too much lower in terms of pricing. Otherwise, we would see a significant drop in the supply of oil.

Just to give you a sense of the scale here, we’re expected to grow demand by one million barrels per day, and we have 650,000 barrels that need an oil price north of $80.

Pricing Black Gold to Stay in the Black

Another significant factor is the price that’s necessary for countries that produce crude oil or export crude oil out of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) or non-OPEC.

Producer Country Budget Breakeven Prices
click to enlarge

On average, you need to see $95-per-barrel prices in order for these countries to balance their budgets—their fiscal budgets. What really sticks out is Russia and Saudi Arabia. They’re the two largest exporters of crude oil and, as you can see above, Russia requires an oil price north of $100, Saudi Arabia right at about $95 per barrel on a Brent basis, and we’re below that number now.

The next OPEC meeting is in November. I would be surprised if we did not see another production cut if oil prices remain at these levels. I think that OPEC and the Saudis need to come in and support prices even more so than they already have following the cut in August.

U.S. Gushing Oil

One area that’s been very topical and interesting as of late is the growth in U.S. crude oil production. It’s at a new 25-year high.

U.S. Crude Oil Production at a 25-Year High
click to enlarge

We’ve gone from basically 4.5 million barrels in 2008 to 8.5 million barrels. Energy stocks are no longer just the commodity play. They’re also a volume growth play.

You can see this paradigm shift in that many of these shale producers have gone out and invested a lot of capital over the years and now, over the next two years or so, we’re going to start to see a free cash flow payback on that initial investment and infrastructure in fracking and developing their resource.

U.S. Oilfield Cash Flow and Capital Expenditure
click to enlarge

Because they’re going to start seeing free cash flow, I think there’s the potential we could get a rerating in multiples to that cash flow. Instead of trading four to six times, maybe we trade higher, somewhere between seven or eight times due to that positive free cash flow metric.

Commodities: A Value Play

Commodities have way underperformed other asset classes, bonds, U.S. equity, and we feel like this is where the value is at. This is the area where you can put capital to work for the long term and outperform, whereas some of the other areas such as in bonds or U.S. stocks may not perform as well.

Class Returns
click to enlarge

There are pockets of strength within the commodity sector where I think we will see companies profit and do well. On the whole, given this pullback, I’m very optimistic about resources going forward.


No Faith in the G20 Central Bankers

G20 finance ministers and central bank governors meeting in WashingtonLast weekend the finance ministers and central bank governors of the world’s top 20 economies met in Washington to discuss, among other issues, solutions to Europe’s weak economic performance. The region, whose sluggishness has negatively affected the global market, is at risk of dipping into its third recession since 2008.

I have no confidence that this body can persuade Europe to act sooner rather than later to dig itself out of further economic hardship. As I’ve observed in my global travels, the G20 central bankers are not interested in promoting and facilitating trade among nations. Instead, they’re interested foremost in levying more taxes and imposing more regulations that actually impede international trade.

It’s Economics 101: Capital cannot be spurred or created with high taxes and strangulating regulations.

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi assures the media that the eurozone will recover soon, but as we wait, the region continues to underperform and drag the rest of the markets down with it. European growth in the second quarter was flat, and this quarter doesn’t look as if it will fare much better. France’s manufacturing sector has steadily contracted. Over the last 12 months, it’s seen only two PMI scores above 50, which would indicate expansion. Even usually-reliable Germany, the eurozone’s largest economy, is in the midst of a downturn.

The U.S. has been gradually recovering from its worst economic period since the Great Depression, and to continue this progress, we need strong trading partners. Investors have become impatient waiting for Europe to get its fiscal act together and stop trying to rationalize even more taxes and regulations.

If it weren’t for the U.S. and Canada propping up the rest of the world, Europe would likely be in a more depressed state than it already is. 

Again, you can still catch the replay of last week’s webcast, which includes more on macroeconomics and a timely discussion of gold and gold stocks with portfolio manager Ralph Aldis.

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Distributed by U.S. Global Brokerage, Inc.

Quarter End Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/2014
YTD 1
Year
5
Year
10
Year
Since
Inception
Gross
Expense
Ratio
Expense
Cap
-28.74% -28.74% -3.22% 3.26% 4.11% 1.60% n/a

Expense ratios as stated in the most recent prospectus. Performance data quoted above is historical. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Results reflect the reinvestment of dividends and other earnings. For a portion of the periods, the fund had expense limitations, without which returns would have been lower. Current performance may be higher or lower than the performance data quoted. The principal value and investment return of an investment will fluctuate so that your shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Performance does not include the effect of any direct fees described in the fund's prospectus (e.g., short-term trading fees of 0.05%) which, if applicable, would lower your total returns. Performance quoted for periods of one year or less is cumulative and not annualized. Obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end at www.usfunds.com or 1-800-US-FUNDS

Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. Because the Global Resources Fund concentrates its investments in specific industries, the fund may be subject to greater risks and fluctuations than a portfolio representing a broader range of industries.

The J.P. Morgan Global Purchasing Manager’s Index is an indicator of the economic health of the global manufacturing sector. The PMI index is based on five major indicators: new orders, inventory levels, production, supplier deliveries and the employment environment.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies. The S&P 500 Materials Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the material sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Energy Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the energy sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 1500 Energy Index is an unmanaged market capitalization index that tracks the companies in the energy sector as a subset of the S&P 1500.

There is no guarantee that the issuers of any securities will declare dividends in the future or that, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time. Note that stocks and Treasury bonds differ in investment objectives, costs and expenses, liquidity, safety, guarantees or insurance, fluctuation of principal or return, and tax features.

Standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of a set of data from its mean. The more spread apart the data, the higher the deviation. Standard deviation is also known as historical volatility.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. Past performance does not guarantee future results. This news release may include certain “forward-looking statements” including statements relating to revenues, expenses, and expectations regarding market conditions. These statements involve certain risks and uncertainties. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove accurate and actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies. The “Top 50” is a group of resource stocks that U.S. Global Investors selects based on the factors shown above. This group of stocks represents a subgroup of the portfolio of the Global Resources Funds. A fund’s yield may differ from the average yield of dividend-paying stocks held by the fund. Holdings are subject to change and past performance does not guarantee future results.

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U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index Heats up While China PMI Cools
September 10, 2014

Jobs, jobs: The U.S. ISM manufacturing Index for August is at a three-year high - U.S. Global InvestorsYou can always count on the United States of America to help boost global manufacturing growth. In its monthly Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) report, JP Morgan announced that the global PMI showed a slight uptick from 52.5 in July to 52.6 in August. The U.S. is again one of the top drivers alongside the Czech Republic, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Canada.

The U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index—our version of the PMI—rose more than 3 percent to close at a stellar 59.0, a three-year high. Meanwhile, China’s PMI inched down 0.6 points in August, from 51.7 to 51.1, ending a five-month winning streak beginning in February.

The monthly index tracks five major indicators in the manufacturing sector, including inventory levels, new orders, production, employment and supplier deliveries. The greater the number above 50.0, the greater the manufacturing expansion over the previous month. Anything below 50.0 would indicate a contraction. Economists rely on these numbers to adjust their GDP estimates.

That the U.S. nearly reached 60.0 supports the belief that we’re in for a robust second half. As I told Palisade Radio’s Collin Kettel recently, the U.S. “hit the ball right out of the park. You can’t even find the ball. It’s gone right past the parking lot. And that makes the dollar very strong.” 

U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index at a Three-Year-High - U.S. Global Investors
click to enlarge


This news is tempered somewhat by the most recent nonfarm payroll employment data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Total employment in the U.S. rose by a weaker-than-expected 142,000 in August, compared with an average monthly increase of 212,000 over the last 12 months.

On the bright side, the National Federation of Independent Business’s Optimism Index, which measures job openings, job creation, capital spending and inventory investment, gained 0.4 points in August to end at 96.1, the second-best reading since October 2007. The largest gains in employment occurred in professional and business services and health care.

Emerging Markets
Commercial and business services also topped the growth ranking in August among global emerging markets, while health care services came in at number six. Business-facing and financial sectors posted their fastest expansion rate since January 2012, closing in on 60.0.  

Detailed Breakdown of Global Sector PMI - U.S. Global Investors
click to enlarge

Again, China cooled in August, interrupting its positive five-month run. But at 51.1, manufacturing activity is still expanding, just at a slower pace.

Despite a Slight Pullback in August, China's PMI Maintains Growth - U.S. Global Investors
click to enlarge

This slowdown is partially attributable to fewer orders from and weaker outputs to Europe, which trades more with China than the U.S. does. Europe’s flagging economy, as a result, has been a setback for China.

European imports to China, in fact, declined in August to a 14-month low compared to August 2013. Of the five indicators that compose China’s overall PMI, the New Orders Index dropped the most, from 53.6 to 52.5, a loss of 2 percent.

Another factor that led to China’s downgraded PMI is the country’s reduction in manufacturing jobs as part of cost-cutting measures. Its Employed Persons Index saw a minor dip from 48.3 to 48.2.

Many economists, as well as portfolio manager of our China Region Fund (USCOX) Xian Liang, are now waiting to see if China will announce further stimulus measures to prevent the world’s second-largest economy from slipping even further. Although Premier Li Keqiang has repeatedly dismissed the possibility of another full-blown bailout, typical monetary policy solutions might include cutting interest rates and reducing the amount of reserves banks must hold as deposits.

Will the People's BAnk of China enact further forms of monetary easing? U.S. Global Investors

To learn more about what’s driving the global economy, be sure to sign up for our upcoming webcast, “One World Market, Many Central Banks: How Will Your Investments Be Impacted?” The free webcast is scheduled to be held on Thursday, October 2, at 4:30 ET. We hope you’ll join us! 

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Distributed by U.S. Global Brokerage, Inc.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. By investing in a specific geographic region, a regional fund’s returns and share price may be more volatile than those of a less concentrated portfolio.

The J.P. Morgan Global Purchasing Manager’s Index is an indicator of the economic health of the global manufacturing sector. The PMI index is based on five major indicators: new orders, inventory levels, production, supplier deliveries and the employment environment. The ISM manufacturing composite index is a diffusion index calculated from five of the eight sub-components of a monthly survey of purchasing managers at roughly 300 manufacturing firms from 21 industries in all 50 states.

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Why We Invest Heavily in Poland
July 9, 2014

There’s a reason why Poland retains the number two slot in our Emerging Europe Fund (EUROX), following Turkey. Ever since the fall of communism in 1989, the country has risen steadily, from a fledgling republic beset by near-bankruptcy, a deteriorating infrastructure and an East-West identity crisis, to emerge as one of the European Union’s (EU) most prosperous nations, alongside the U.K., France, Germany and Spain.

The latest issue of The Economist, in fact, asserts that Poland has had its best 25 years in half a millennium, citing its relatively quick market-oriented recovery, decrease in public spending and insistence on keeping its native currency, the flexible złoty, in favor of adopting the euro.

For these reasons and more, Poland was the only country in the EU—of which it’s been a member since 2004—to dodge the recession that struck Europe in the late 2000s. More recently, the international sanctions against Russia following its invasion of the Crimean Peninsula have also benefited Poland, as many investors have found it to be a safer, less volatile place for their money.

In a recent interview with VoiceAmerica, U.S. Global Investor’s Director of Research John Derrick said:

[Poland is] used as a safe haven in the region: stable economy, stable political environment. It’s benefited from the European recovery and doesn’t have that much trade with Russia.

Many economists now believe that Poland will eventually join ranks with the top 20 economies in the world, perhaps by as early as 2030. It currently sits at number 22, 23 or 24, depending on the source.

As you can see in the chart below, Poland has consistently outpaced its EU peers in the eurozone for the last 10 years, never once dipping below zero percent growth.

Poland Leads Economic Growth in Europe
click to enlarge

An eye for business.
Poland has grown in economic strength largely because it offers the EU low-wage yet high-quality labor. Many German companies can get a better production deal from their eastern neighbor than they can from China.

Although Poland doesn’t have any internationally recognizable brands, there are a few held in EUROX worth mentioning.

One of the most successful and lucrative companies is Powszechna Kasa Oszczędności Bank Polski, which translates roughly to “Polish General Savings Bank.” With a net income of over $1 billion, PKO Bank Polski, as it’s popularly known, is the largest and most highly rated bank not just in Poland but also Central and Eastern Europe. Founded in 1919, the bank is headquartered in Warsaw.

Another Warsaw company in the financial industry is Powszechny Zakład Ubezpieczeń, or PZU Group. With a net income just below $1 billion, it’s one of the top insurance groups in Central and Eastern Europe.

ENERGA Group, which rounds out the top three Polish stocks in EUROX, held its initial public offering (IPO) in December of last year. With over 118,000 miles of power lines, ENERGA is one of Poland’s leading energy providers, servicing close to 3 million customers. A significant percentage of the power it generates comes from renewable energy sources such as wind, biomass and run-of-the-river hydroelectricity. ENERGA reported a high return on equity (ROE) in the first quarter of this year, soaring to 10.6 percent, up from 4.4 percent in the same quarter last year.

Always seeking growth and opportunity.
If any country knows how to overcome crushing war and hardship, it’s Poland. Having been invaded and antagonized countless times over the centuries by nations such as Russia, Sweden, Austria, Hungary, Turkey and, most notably, Germany, it’s had little chance to find its place in the world.

But after 25 years of peace and stability, Poland is finally on a path to great success, ascending more rapidly than any other country in Central or Eastern Europe, with no signs of slowing.

Find out what other holdings we have in our Emerging Europe Fund (EUROX).

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Distributed by U.S. Global Brokerage, Inc.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

Fund portfolios are actively managed, and holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. Holdings in the Emerging Europe Fund (EUROX) as a percentage of net assets as of 6/30/2014: Powszechna Kasa Oszczednosci Bank Polski SA (4.55%), Powszechny Zaklad Ubezpieczen SA (2.86%), Energa SA (2.73%).

Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. By investing in a specific geographic region, a regional fund’s returns and share price may be more volatile than those of a less concentrated portfolio. The Emerging Europe Fund invests more than 25% of its investments in companies principally engaged in the oil & gas or banking industries. The risk of concentrating investments in this group of industries will make the fund more susceptible to risk in these industries than funds which do not concentrate their investments in an industry and may make the fund’s performance more volatile.

By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

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Turkey Is the Big Winner Following the Crisis in Ukraine
June 19, 2014

Turkey Is the Big Winner Following the Crisis in Ukraine

Russia’s annexation of the Crimean Peninsula and the possibility of further action taken in Ukraine and other former Soviet Bloc nations have led many investors to wonder, understandably so, what impact the crisis has had on investment opportunities in Eastern Europe. To unravel these concerns and more, U.S. Global’s Director of Research John Derrick caught up with Gavin Graham of VoiceAmerica’s “Emerging and Frontier Markets Investing” program.

Below you can read some of the interview highlights, in which John speculates on who were the winners and losers in the aftermath of the Russia-Ukraine conflict. He also touches briefly on the violence that has recently erupted in Iraqi Kurdistan and what effect it might have on neighboring Turkey.

Which European countries have the greatest potential and have benefited the most from what’s been happening?

I think Poland’s been a beneficiary. It’s used as a safe haven in the region: stable economy, stable political environment. It’s benefited from the European recovery and doesn’t have that much trade with Russia.

I think Turkey has benefited, more from a money flow standpoint. If you were worried about what was going on in Russia and some of the longer-term implications, I think money flowed into places like Turkey. Money also flowed into places like Greece because a lot of the international investors tend to be regional investors, and within that region, there are shift allocations into places like Turkey, which has been a very strong performer this year. Part of that money is coming out of Russia.

That’s a very fair point because, as you say, if you’re running a dedicated Eastern European fund, Russia’s been overwhelmingly the largest weight within it, though a fair number of people were underweight even before Crimea because of concerns about governance and the like. Nonetheless, where are you going to go? Turkey is obviously a major market. Some of the reasons you like it include the demographics as well as the government’s pro-business attitude.

Exactly. If you just take a step back and look at the long-term secular growth, the demographics are very positive. There’s an entrepreneurial culture in Turkey: good government policies generally speaking toward business development, toward foreign investors. Basically business can get done, businesses can be created, and all those kinds of things that most Americans can relate to.

It’s still an emerging market country, and they’ll do things that you’ll look at and scratch your head, like banning Twitter or Facebook. But the political situation has definitely calmed down, and so I think the long-term secular story for Turkey is probably the best long-term secular story in the region. That’s what you want to hitch your wagon to over the long run.

Now I know that maybe one or two eyebrows will have been raised by you mentioning that Greece has been seen as a safe haven, but you are very right and very early in picking Greece as a market that had some very positive changes taking place. Do you want to just briefly recap where we are now?

Six years into a recession, Greece is finally starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel. They’ve made some significant structural changes. Essentially the banking system has been consolidated down. There are now four major players there. All in the last month, they actually have recapitalized, raised money. That put some pressure on the Greek market and banks over the last month or so, and it puts them on a much firmer footing. The banking system can function more properly, and you can actually start seeing real growth.

The European Central Bank (ECB) has been very supportive. The ECB announced a TARP-like program where you can get long-term funding—essentially a four-year repo currently at 25 basis points. That’s going to be positive for peripheral banks in general whether it’s Greece or Spain or Italy.

They’ve also talked about doing a securitization program where you get some kind of quantitative easing. All those kinds of incremental things are very positive for Greece. After six years of recession, they’re finally starting to come out of it. It’s just like a natural cycle. It doesn’t stay bad forever. That’s going to continue for the next 12 to 18 months.

Which is about as long as one can look ahead, especially with exciting things like the Ukrainian crisis happening. Briefly, in terms of those countries, which don’t look as attractive? Presumably the Baltic republics, which are seen as being more vulnerable, given what happened with Crimea and Ukraine?

Definitely. There’s concern there that Russian expansionism is going to continue. Will NATO really defend those countries if Russia tries to re-exert its influence in those regions? I think those have been areas that have been hurt by the crisis because they’re viewed as the next dominoes, if you will. Obviously those are not big markets and have limited investment opportunities, but definitely I think they’ve been negatively impacted. People aren’t really sure what the Russians’ ultimate goals are here, what they’re really trying to accomplish: are they done, or are they trying to recreate the Soviet Union?

Just to finish up, in terms of talking about military action, you were mentioning earlier about what’s been happening in Iraq where an al-Qaeda-linked group has taken over the second major city, Mosul, in Iraq and led to hundreds of its inhabitants fleeing. Maybe that’s going to have some effect on next-door neighbor Turkey?

The Turkish market is down about 3 percent today, and currency’s down 1 percent or so. Obviously it sounds like the situation in Iraq is deteriorating pretty rapidly. That’s a pretty significant development. It just raises a lot of questions about what’s happening there and what’s going to be the impact for Turkey. There’s a fair amount of trade that goes across there—oil pipelines that they’ve finally got up and running, particularly in the north in the Kurdistan region, sending oil to Turkey. There’s still some controversy about who’s going to buy it because they don’t have an agreement with the central government.

Nevertheless, there’s oil and gas and all those kinds of things that are good for Turkey in the long run. I look at today’s developments as probably likely a buying opportunity in Turkey.

Indeed, having reduced our exposure in Russia following the events in Ukraine, our Emerging Europe Fund (EUROX) now invests the largest percentage of its assets in Turkey (24.29 percent), followed by Poland (14.75 percent) and Greece (11.80 percent).

You can listen to John’s entire interview below, starting 18 minutes into the program.

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Distributed by U.S. Global Brokerage, Inc.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. By investing in a specific geographic region, a regional fund’s returns and share price may be more volatile than those of a less concentrated portfolio. The Emerging Europe Fund invests more than 25% of its investments in companies principally engaged in the oil & gas or banking industries. The risk of concentrating investments in this group of industries will make the fund more susceptible to risk in these industries than funds which do not concentrate their investments in an industry and may make the fund’s performance more volatile.

BRIC refers to the emerging market countries Brazil, Russia, India and China.

 

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Net Asset Value
as of 09/25/2017

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $5.78 -0.04 Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $8.02 0.06 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $6.69 0.06 China Region Fund USCOX $10.96 -0.46 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $6.94 -0.06 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $24.34 0.10 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $19.99 0.03 Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.23 No Change U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $2.00 No Change