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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

Revisit My 5 Most Popular Posts of 2018
December 31, 2018

Revisit My 5 Most Popular Posts of 2018

Looking back over the past 12 months, I’m not surprised to see that my five most popular and widely shared posts of 2018 involve gold (with one exception). With many stocks falling into correction territory or worse, the yellow metal emerged as a standout asset in the fourth quarter on safe haven demand. Senior gold miners, as measured by the NYSE Arca Gold Miners Index, also performed well, rising more than 13 percent in the December quarter.

That said, below I count down my five most popular posts, beginning with a story about Texas, the home state of U.S. Global Investors.

5. Texas Gold Investors Just Got Their Own Fort Knox

The Texas Bullion Depository, the first of its kind in the U.S., officially opened to the public in Austin in early June, capping three years of planning and construction. At the time, Texans were able to deposit their gold and other precious metals at an already-existing facility. Earlier this month, though, officials broke ground on a new, state-of-the-art, 40,000-square-foot facility in Leander, Texas, just north of Austin.

The Texas bullion depository is the first in the nation

This is wonderful news. Because Texas is such a trend-setting state, it might encourage other states to look into creating their own depositories. It also has the potential to attract even more investors to precious metals, which I believe are crucial components of any well-diversified portfolio.

4. It’s Time for Contrarians to Get Bullish on Gold

For most of 2018, the gold bears were large and in charge, with hedge funds shorting the yellow metal in record numbers this past summer. A major contributor to this is gold’s negative correlation to the U.S. dollar, which was strong relative to other major world currencies throughout the year.

A bottom in gold prices looked especially likely after Vanguard, the world’s largest mutual fund company, announced it was closing its precious metals and mining fund. Back in 2001, when gold had similarly found a bottom, Vanguard dropped the word “gold” from what was then the Gold and Precious Metals Fund, and the change coincided with a decade-long precious metals bull run.

Does Vanguards latest fund name change mean gold has found a bottom
click to enlarge

So could this mean another bull run is in the works? No one can say for sure, of course, but the timing of Vanguard’s announcement was certainly interesting. Now that gold is trading above $1,280 again for the first time since June, my confidence that the metal is set for a huge breakout has only grown stronger.

3. Here’s How We Discovered This Disruptive Gold Stock Before It Went Public

Mene jewelry
Photo courtesy of Menē

In November I shared with you one of my favorite new precious metal jewelry companies—Menē. You might not be familiar with the name yet, but you could be soon enough. In its first 10 months of operation, Menē did as much as $7 million in sales, and in more than 53 countries, as of October.

Founded in 2017, the company’s mission is to disrupt the gold jewelry market. It aims to do this by making its pieces strictly from 24-karat gold or platinum, selling directly to the consumer and pricing its merchandise fairly and transparently. Unlike traditional sellers, Menē prices its jewelry based on the changing value of gold, then charges a 15 percent to 20 percent design and production fee on top of that.

Here at U.S. Global Investors, we believe gold is money and a timeless investment. Menē , which takes its name from the Aramaic word for “money,” has clearly run with that idea, going so far as to trademark the phrase “investment jewelry.” We see the company as an attractive way to invest in gold’s Love Trade.

2. Which Has the Biggest Economy: Texas or Russia?

With Russia in the news almost daily this year, thanks mostly to the investigation into the 2016 U.S. presidential election, I wanted to know which had the larger economy—Russia or Texas. (Spoiler alert: It’s Texas, by about $400 billion.)

December 21, 2017 Signing of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA)

At the time of my writing this, Russia was ranked as the number one oil producer in the world. In September, however, the U.S. regained the title after pumping out nearly 11 million barrels per day late in the summer, a feat the American industry has never before achieved. Today, the U.S. produces between 11.60 and 11.70 million barrels per day, whereas Russia averages around 11.37 million barrels.

On a similar note, the International Energy Agency (IEA) just issued its prediction that, by 2025, the total amount of U.S. oil production would equal that of Russia and Saudi Arabia combined.

1. It’s Time for the Fear Trade to Move Gold Prices

My post popular post of 2018 was, coincidentally, also the very first thing I wrote this year. The yellow metal had ended 2017 up more than 13 percent, its best year since 2010, while senior gold miners gained more than 11 percent. All of this occurred even as the stock market closed regularly at all-time highs and the price of bitcoin was rising by leaps and bounds.

I attributed gold’s strong 2017 performance mainly to the Fear Trade, specifically to concerns over inflation. Interestingly, inflation never really materialized this year—the year-over-year percent change in the consumer price index (CPI) didn’t even breach 3 percent. Most forecasts for 2019 are just as mild.

However, there are other things to keep an eye on in the new year—namely, the ballooning U.S. deficit; growing debt at the consumer, corporate and government levels; rising interest rates; and signs of a global economic slowdown. What’s more, Democrats take control of the U.S. House of Representatives next month. We can probably expect to see multiple investigations into the Trump administration, which could possibly slow the progress of additional pro-growth, pro-business policies.

Taken together, these risks burnish the investment case of gold’s Fear Trade. I remain bullish on the metal for 2019 and recommend a 10 percent portfolio weighting: 5 percent in bullion and jewelry and the other 5 percent in well-managed gold mining stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

The NYSE Arca Gold Miners Index is a modified market capitalization weighted index comprised of publicly traded companies involved primarily in the mining for gold and silver.  The index benchmark value was 500.0 at the close of trading on December 20, 2002.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is one of the most widely recognized price measures for tracking the price of a market basket of goods and services purchased by individuals.  The weights of components are based on consumer spending patterns.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 9/30/2018: Menē Inc.

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Christmas Comes Early for This Precious Metals Streaming Company
December 17, 2018

Gold mining investors and Canadian capital markets received an early Christmas gift last Friday. Wheaton Precious Metals, one of the largest precious metals streaming companies in the world, announced that it reached a settlement with the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA), the equivalent of the IRS. Before now, Wheaton had been in an ongoing legal feud with the agency over international transactions between 2005 and 2010.

According to the agreement, income generated through Wheaton’s foreign subsidiaries will not be subject to Canadian taxes. The company, however, will need to mark-up the cost of service provided to foreign subsidiaries, from 20 percent to 30 percent.

“The settlement removes uncertainty with the use of our business model going forward and puts the tax issue behind us so that we can continue to focus on what we do best: building and managing our high-quality portfolio both organically and by accretive acquisitions,” commented Randy Smallwood, Wheaton president and CEO.

“We expect the stock to react positively to the news given the tax dispute was an overhang,” Credit Suisse analysts shared in a note to investors today. Indeed, Wheaton stock was trading up as much as 12.4 percent in New York following the news, hitting a four-month high of $19.63 a share.

wheaton precious metals stock jumped after tax settlement news
click to enlarge

I want to congratulate everyone at Wheaton, particularly Randy for his resilience and strong leadership. He’s always offered invaluable insights to our team and investors. I encourage interested registered investment advisors (RIAs) to check out the July 2018 webcast I did with Randy, where we discussed our seven top reasons to invest in gold. You can listen to the replay by clicking here.

congrats Wheaton Precious Metals Randy Smallwood CEO

Monetary and Fiscal Risks Boost Gold’s Investment Case

The investment case for gold and other precious metals got a boost last week in light of news that might concern some equity investors. The European Central Bank (ECB) announced that it would be drawing quantitative easing (QE) measures to a close by halting its 2.6 trillion-euro bond-purchasing program, begun four years ago as a means to provide liquidity to the eurozone economy after the financial crisis. Interest rates, however, will be kept at historically low levels for the time being.

The ECB, then, will become the next big central bank, after the Federal Reserve, to end QE and normalize monetary policy. Although it’s steadily been tapering its own purchases of bonds, the Bank of Japan (BOJ) is still committed to providing liquidity at this point. Assets in the Japanese bank now stand north of 553.6 trillion yen ($4.86 trillion)—which, amazingly, is more than 100 percent of the country’s entire gross domestic product (GDP). Holdings, in fact, are larger than the combined economies of India, Turkey, Argentina, Indonesia and South Africa.

Major Central Banks' Total Assets
click to enlarge

In the past, I’ve discussed the economic and financial risks when central banks begin to unwind their balance sheets. The Fed has reduced its assets six times separate occassions before now, and all but one of those times ended in recession, according to research firm MKM Partners.

“Business cycles don’t just end accidentally,” MKM Chief Economist Mike Darda said in 2017. “They are killed by the Fed.”

We can now add the ECB and, at some point, the BOJ to this list. The three top central banks control approximately $14 trillion in assets, a mind-boggling sum, and it’s unclear at this point what the ramifications might be once these assets are allowed to roll over.

The Widest November Budget Deficit on Record

In addition, the Treasury Department revealed last week that the U.S. posted its widest budget deficit in the nation’s history for the month of November, as spending was double the amount of revenue the government brought in. The budget shortfall, then, came in at a record $205 billion, almost 50 percent over the spending gap from a year ago.

This follows news that U.S. government debt is on pace to expand this year at its fastest pace since 2012. Total public debt has jumped by $1.36 trillion, or 6.6 percent, since the start of 2018, making it the biggest expansion in percentage terms since the last year of President Barack Obama’s first term, Bloomberg reports.

As of last Monday, the national debt stood at just under $22 trillion, and by as soon as 2022, it could top $25 trillion, according to estimates.

U.S. Debt Projected to Jump by $7.5 trillion from 2016 to 2023
click to enlarge

As I shared with you in November, the government could very well be in a “debt spiral” right now, in the words of Black Swan author Nassim Taleb. This means it must borrow to repay its creditors. And with rates on the rise, servicing all this debt will continue to get more and more expensive.

It’s for this reason, among others, that I recommend a 10 percent weighting in gold, with 5 percent in bullion and gold jewelry, the other 5 percent in high-quality gold stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.

Will There Be a Santa Claus Rally?

U.S. Debt Projected to Jump by $7.5 trillion from 2016 to 2023

On a final note, there are only a few more trading days left to 2018. Will we see a Santa Claus rally? Last week I had the opportunity to speak with CNBC Asia’s Akiko Fujita on this very topic. To watch the interview and hear my thoughts, click here!

 

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 9/30/2018: Wheaton Precious Metals Corp.

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No One Ever Said Brexit Was Going to Be Easy
December 11, 2018

The Yield Curve Just Inverted for the First Time in Years. Time to Reconsider Risk?

If you followed some of my posts from two years ago, you might recall that I was in favor of Brexit. I still am. One of British voters’ main grievances was the heavy burden of European Union (EU) regulations, many of which are decided by unelected bureaucrats in Brussels. Altogether, these regulations cost U.K. businesses an estimated 33.3 billion pounds every year. Voters should have the right to decide whether to abide by these rules, which hamper business, or choose a different path.

At the same time, I was realistic about the huge, unprecedented challenges this divorce presented—to the United Kingdom, but also to the EU and its main trading partners. “Global growth is unstable, especially in the EU, and Brexit will only add to the instability,” I wrote. “This will likely continue to be the case in the short and intermediate terms as markets digest the implications of the U.K.’s historic exit.”

No one said it was going to be easy.

Today was supposed to be the day when U.K. Members of Parliament (MPs) voted on Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal with the EU, capping off two and a half years since Britons elected to leave the 28-member bloc.

Yesterday, however, May postponed the vote in the face of certain defeat, thanks largely to disagreement over how best to deal with the border between Northern Ireland (part of the U.K.) and the Republic of Ireland (part of the EU).

The British pound sterling promptly lost as much as 1.25 percent against the U.S. dollar, falling to its lowest level in more than a year and a half as foreign investors halted nearly all trading of the currency, according to the Financial Times.

British stocks, as measured by the FTSE 100 Index, extended losses for the fourth time out of the past five trading days. Telescoping their uncertainty of May’s deal, investors sent London-listed stocks plummeting 3.15 percent last Thursday in the worst session since the day after the Brexit referendum in June 2016.

British pound and stocks slipped after delay of Brexit vote
click to enlarge

The question on everyone’s mind is: What happens now? 

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

As I see it, there are three main options: 1) leave the EU without a deal (the “hard” Brexit); 2) halt the entire Brexit process, leaving open the possibility of another referendum; and 3) go back to the drawing board and renegotiate.

By any measure, a hard Brexit would be disastrous. Thomas Verbraken, executive director of risk management research at MSCI, estimates that U.K. stocks could fall as much as 25 percent, European stocks at least 10 percent, if either Parliament rejects the deal or a “disorderly Brexit” is triggered. In such a scenario, according to Morningstar’s Alex Morozov, the British auto industry would fare the worst since its entire supply chain is highly integrated with the EU, including parts manufacturing and vehicle production. U.K. and EU aerospace and defense companies such as Airbus, Rolls-Royce and Meggitt are also highly exposed to Brexit risks.

As for the second option, May has already nixed the idea of bringing a halt to Brexit, even though the European Court of Justice (ECJ) just ruled that the U.K. can “unilaterally withdraw its notification to leave the European Union without the permission of other EU countries,” according to Politico.

May’s job may be in peril because of her handling of Brexit—Jeremy Corbyn, leader of U.K.’s Labour Party, could push for a vote of no confidence at some point—but here I think she made the right decision. The people of the United Kingdom spoke. Even though Britons’ approval of EU leadership has improved since the 2016 referendum, disapproval is still above 50 percent.  

More than half of britons still disapprove of european union leadership
click to enlarge

That brings us to option number three. The problem here is that the nearly-600-page agreement already required a year’s worth of back-and-forth. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker made clear today that Brussels will not reopen negotiations. “The deal we have achieved is the best deal possible—it’s the only deal possible,” Juncker said. “So there is no room whatsoever for renegotiation.”

What there is room for, according to Juncker, is clarification and reinterpretation of the deal.

So Where Does This Leave Things?

I don’t believe anyone knows the answer to this question. As of now, the U.K. is scheduled to leave the 28-member bloc on March 29 of next year. I hope that before that time, MPs can be convinced that the package May has delivered is the best possible solution to an impossible situation.

I urge investors to be cautious. Brexit isn’t the only geopolitical risk to stocks right now. Here in the U.S., Democrats will take control of the House in about a month, and although talk of impeaching President Donald Trump is premature, it’s certain we’ll see innumerable new investigations into this administration.

With a new year about to begin, it might be a good time to rebalance your portfolio and make sure you have a 10 percent weighting in gold, with 5 percent in bullion and jewelry, the other 5 percent in high-quality gold mining stocks, mutual funds and ETFs. I also recommend short-term, tax-free municipal bonds, as they’ve performed well even in times of economic pullbacks and bear markets.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The FTSE 100 Index is an index of the 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange with the highest market capitalization.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. None of the securities mentioned in the article were held by any accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 9/30/2018.

 

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Minute with the Analyst: Meet Joanna Sawicka
October 3, 2018

Meet Joanna Sawicka – an emerging Europe research analyst at U.S. Global Investors. Prior to joining our team in 2007, Joanna was part of Soros Fund Management in New York and JP Morgan in San Antonio. Since 2015, she has worked on the Investment team and currently is primarily responsible for analyzing companies in emerging European countries.

In this brief Q&A, I invite you to learn more about Joanna’s path to becoming an emerging Europe analyst and read what she sees on the horizon for this region as we head into year end.

What made you want to become an investment analyst?

I always knew that I wanted to pursue a career in finance. However, I didn’t know which section of the industry would suit me best until I visited the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) for one of my classes at Baruch College. During this visit, we went to the floor of the exchange and toured a huge vault full of gold. Watching the trading and experiencing the atmosphere firsthand left a huge impression on me. It was after this trip that I moved steadily over to investments.

While working on my investment specialization in school, I especially enjoyed my simulation class. In it, we were given half a million dollars to grow. If I remember correctly, I invested in oil futures and bought Disney stock. I actually made a lot of money!

What was the most memorable trip you’ve taken for your job?

While I have traveled to many fascinating places, like the Warsaw Stock Exchange, to me, the most interesting trip was to the Wood & Company CEE Investor Days Conference in New York earlier this year. I was very surprised by how many people at the conference wanted to learn more about eastern Europe. The number of attendees speaking Polish also caught me off guard, though it makes sense since Wood & Company has a big presence in Poland.

You took a trip to Poland this summer. Did you notice any changes in the country since your last time there?

For the past three years, I have made an annual trip to Poland. Being there so frequently makes it a bit harder to see changes. Having said that, I did notice quite a bit of construction, in particular highway construction. Two years ago, when my flight landed in Warsaw, it took three or four hours to drive to my hometown, Bialystock, because the highway was not complete. This year, the drive only took two hours. There is still a lot of construction, especially on the east side, but the improvements are very apparent.

Many new businesses, small and large, began to appear starting 10 years ago, resulting in new construction projects like shopping centers. People are actually spending a lot of money. That is the most notable change to me in the last decade or so.  

Poland was recently upgraded to a developed market by FTSE Russell. What is on the horizon for Poland? Do you believe its growth is sustainable?

The upgrade to a developed market is very positive for Poland. The next step would be updating the country on the MSCI Emerging Markets Index. It’s my understanding that Poland is only missing one factor – gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. That isn’t quite strong enough yet. Once that happens, there will be more inflows into Polish equities.

Joanna Sawicka emerging europe research analyst U.S. Global Investors

It is important to mention that Poland is very strong in central emerging Europe and has the largest stock markets. There are more than 350 stocks trading on the Warsaw Stock Exchange, compared to only a handful in other central emerging European markets. Most of the stocks in other geographically similar markets, like Hungary and the Czech Republic, are not very liquid. The large equity market in Poland makes it much more accessible for larger investors.

Additionally, Poland is growing at around 5 percent, has stable inflation, low unemployment and solid consumer spending. Given these facts, I believe Poland’s growth is sustainable.

Do you see growing nationalism as a risk?

In central emerging Europe, nationalism has always had a presence, such as the Law and Justice in Poland (PiS) and Fidesz in Hungary. However, this trend is not specific to the region. In fact, it has spread into Western Europe. A far right government came into power in Austria last year. The elections in Italy, Germany and Sweden saw similar movements. I do not currently believe this is a threat, but we will have to see how it develops.

The recent emerging market sell-off has captured a lot of headlines. What is your outlook on emerging markets for the rest of 2018?

Emerging markets peaked around mid-January this year and, since then, stocks are down about 20 percent. Emerging markets were suppressed by dramatic currency depreciation in Turkey and Argentina.  At one point, we saw the lira drop about 25 percent in a couple days. Argentina experienced a huge drop as well, though the central bank of Argentina was a little more supportive with its rate hikes.

I think we are at a turning point now and emerging Europe will rebound. The Turkish bank just recently hiked rates by 625 basis points, which is very supportive of the lira. Additionally, when the price crosses above the 50-day moving average, we expect inflows. I noticed a cross in emerging markets and emerging Europe, so I think this uptrend will continue towards the end of the year.

With oil on the rise, Turkey looks even more vulnerable. Should investors be concerned?

Brent moving higher is certainly negative for Turkey, since it’s a major importer of crude oil, but a bigger concern is the weakening lira. Year-to-date, the lira has depreciated around 40 percent. So there is more to it than just higher oil prices, especially considering Turkey’s geopolitical situation.

U.S. sanctions are weighing heavily on Russia’s economy. What is Russia doing to counteract the slowdown?

U.S. sanctions have a significant impact, not only on Russia’s economy, but all of Europe’s growth, as these countries’ economies are interrelated. The latest set of sanctions was the most severe, disallowing American investors to own certain Russian equities which resulted in a sharp sell-off. There may be additional sanctions on the horizon, though no one is sure yet.

In the interim, Russia is taking measures to protect its economy. For example, the government is essentially supporting the ruble by hiking rates and discontinuing weekly forex buying. In March, Vladimir Putin won another presidential term and announced infrastructure reform, which may be supportive for the economy.

Russia is also trying to develop a better relationship with Asia. There is discussion about potentially building a pipeline through North Korea since the situation there has improved somewhat. Acquiring new “friends” could be positive for the Russian economy. 

Want to learn more about emerging Europe? Subscribe to the award-winning Investor Alert newsletter for a weekly recap of the biggest market-moving events.

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

A basis point, or bp, is a common unit of measure for interest rates and other percentages in finance. One basis point is equal to 1/100th of 1%, or 0.01% (0.0001).

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure equity market performance in the global emerging markets.

Gross domestic product (GDP) is the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country's borders in a specific time period, though GDP is usually calculated on an annual basis. It includes all of private and public consumption, government outlays, investments and exports less imports that occur within a defined territory.

None of the U.S. Global Investors funds held any of the securities mentioned in this article as of 6/30/18.

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Two Big Reasons Why I Believe China Looks Attractive Right Now
September 25, 2018

emerging markets look like a buy after decoupling from the U.S. market

Emerging markets continue to decouple from the U.S. market, making them look attractive as a value play—particularly distressed Chinese equities. Below I’ll share with you two big reasons why I think China is well-positioned to outperform over the long term.

So far this year, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index has given up about 10 percent, mostly on currency weakness and global trade fears. The S&P 500 Index, meanwhile, has advanced roughly 9 percent as a flood of passive index buying pushes valuations up and companies buy back their own stock at a record pace.

emerging markets look like a buy after decoupling from the U.S. market
click to enlarge

S&P Dow Jones Indices reported this week that buybacks in the second quarter increased almost 60 percent from the same three months a year ago to a record $190.6 billion. For the 12 months ended June 30, S&P 500 companies, flush with cash thanks to corporate tax reform, spent an unprecedented $645.8 billion shrinking their float. In the first half of 2018, in fact, companies spent more on buybacks than they did on capital expenditures.

As I told CNBC recently, this, combined with fewer stocks available for fundamental investing, could contribute toward a massive selloff when it comes time for multibillion-dollar index funds to rebalance at year’s end.

But let’s get back to emerging markets.

The Selloff Is Overdone, According to Experts

Again, China in particular looks like a buying opportunity with stocks down near a four-year low. Speaking with CNBC last week, chief executive of J.P. Morgan Chase’s China business, Mark Leung, said that the emerging market selloff is largely overdone. “If you look at the positioning and also the fundamentals side, we think there are reasons to start going into emerging markets for the medium and long term,” Leung said, adding, “China is a big piece.”

This view was echoed by Catherine Cai, chairman of UBS’s Greater China investment banking arm, who told CNBC that she believes “among all the emerging markets, China’s still representing the most attractive market.”

The U.S. just imposed tariffs on as much as $200 billion worth of Chinese imports, which will have the effect of raising consumer prices. Among the retailers and brands that have already announced they will be passing costs on to consumers are Walmart, General Motors, Toyota, Coca-Cola and MillerCoors. China plans to retaliate with tariffs of its own on $60 billion in U.S. exports. 

Despite this, the tariffs’ impact on the Chinese economy will be “very small,” Cai said, as the country’s government is now “prepared” to handle the additional pressure.

The Power of 600 Million Millennials

The two reasons I find China so compelling right now are 1) promising demographics, and 2) financial reform.

As for the first reason, there’s really no arguing against the sheer math of Asia’s exploding population. You’ve heard the expression “There is strength in numbers,” and nowhere is that more apparent than in China and India, affectionately known as “Chindia,” where 40 percent of all humans live.

But there’s more. According to a recent report from CLSA, the entire continent of Asia is now home to nearly one billion millennials, or people aged 20 to 34. China and India alone contribute more than 600 million millennials, the youngest of whom will “start to hit their ‘peak’ earning capacity” over the next 10 years, says CLSA.

Asian millennials are changing global consumption
click to enlarge

“Millennials are more affluent, better educated with difference perspectives and priorities than their parents’ generation, which tends to sacrifice present consumption for the future,” CLSA writes. “Millennials care less about saving.”

This translates into not only the largest consumer class the world has ever seen, but also the most eager to spend their money on goods and services their parents and grandparents could never have imagined.

Consumption, in fact, now accounts for nearly 80 percent of China’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth, helping the country become less dependent on capital input and foreign trade.

China’s Capital Markets Continue to Mature

chinese premiere li keqiang: the pool is full of water and the challenge is to unblock the channels. As for my second reason, financial reform, Premier Li Keqiang recently pledged to give equal treatment to foreign investors in capital markets, all in the name of bolstering confidence among investors who may have been rattled lately by the U.S.-China trade dispute.

“The pool is full of water,” Li said, “and the challenge is to unblock the channels.”

China A-shares, those traded in the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges, were once available only to Chinese citizens living on the mainland. But as a sign of the financial market’s maturation, last week marked the first time that foreign investors living in mainland China, as well as employees of listed Chinese firms living overseas, could freely trade A-shares.

Many A-shares have already been added to indexes provided by MSCI, and FTSE Russell said it will decide soon whether to do the same.

As we’ve seen in the U.S. market and elsewhere, a stock’s inclusion in a major index has meant, for better or worse, that it automatically gets an infusion of investors’ money, regardless of fundamentals.

That Premier Li plans to open China’s market up even further is exciting, and makes its investment case even stronger.

To learn more about investment opportunities in China and the surrounding region, watch our short video by clicking here.

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index captures large and mid-cap representation across 24 Emerging Markets (EM) countries. The S&P 500 index is a basket of 500 of the largest U.S. stocks, weighted by market capitalization. 

Gross domestic product (GDP) is the total value of goods produced and services provided in a country during one year.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 6/30/2018: Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated.

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Net Asset Value
as of 03/22/2019

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $4.51 -0.07 Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $7.38 -0.14 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $2.79 -0.04 China Region Fund USCOX $8.50 -0.19 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $6.59 -0.16 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $23.42 -0.49 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $16.70 -0.31 Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.21 0.01 U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $2.00 No Change